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Total Time
45mins
Prep 15 mins
Cook 30 mins

This is a good old-fashioned recipe. I think from what I could gather from my Mother and Grandmother, Australians made Jam Roly Poly from left over savoury, usually, or sweet pastry. The purpose was not to waste anything, especially during and after the war years. If you have left over pastry you can use that instead of the recipe below. This was a recipe that my Mum used when she wanted to fill the stomachs of the stockmen and shearers. Warning the Roly Poly it will caramelise. Do not use the glaze with you are making a Roly Poly from left over sweet pastry.

Ingredients Nutrition

Directions

  1. Preheat your oven to 450 degrees F In a medium sized bowl, combine the sifted plain flour, baking powder and butter into a dough.
  2. Work into a dough with spatular.
  3. Knead into a dough.
  4. Turn onto a floured board.
  5. Roll out into a rectangle and spread jam (jelly) of your choice.
  6. Spread almost to the edge of the pastry.
  7. Roll up starting from the short edge of the rectangle and place into a greased baking dish.
  8. Then into a saucepan combine the butter, sugar and water.
  9. Stir over a medium heat on the stove until the mixture has melted.
  10. Pour mixture over the top of the Roly Poly place in an oven at 450 degrees for 10 mins then 350 degrees for 20 minutes.
  11. Watch the Roly Poly to make sure it does not burn.
  12. It will carmelise.
  13. Service with either, ice cream, custard or cream.
  14. Good luck.
Most Helpful

5 5

Good Gawd! This is the one my Father's Irish housekeeper made for us when we were growing up in New Orleans. If we were very "good" we got to choose what flavour "jam" was used. Her sauce never caramelized, perhaps because she always added a goodly "tot" of whisky or sherry to it! (pefectly acceptable, even for children in N.O...the booze somehow cooked out of it, so it was said). Sometimes she would include pecans all around the roly poly before the sauce was poured over. We loved this, it was always so crispy on top and so wonderfully buttery/sweet/soggy on the bottom. Interesting that you had it in Australia (where I am now) and as children we loved it in N.O. Maybe the Irish took it with them to Australia. I will make it very soon in honor of our Mrs O'Connell (interesting also because in N.O. anyone older than yourself and familiar is invariably called Mz or Mr First Name). Thank you, thank you.